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Bigger, better bins to help contain rubbish issue

It is hoped that 10 new bins will help alleviate rubbish issues in Raglan.

Xtreme Waste co-manager Rick Thorpe presented “a bunch of ideas” to the Raglan Community board last week, addressing residents’ concerns about the amount of rubbish in Raglan.

Rick said eight of the new 100-litre bins would replace old 60-litre bins at the domain, while two new litter and recycling bins would go in at the wharf.

He said the new bins, which were being made by Raglan Engineering, had spring-loaded lids to prevent seagulls from accessing rubbish.

“With greater capacity and better designs the new bins will work better, and with more bins hopefully it will minimise paper issues.”

Xtreme Waste, which is contracted by Waikato District Council to empty the rubbish bins in town, had been criticised by resident Wayne Trott at the previous meeting for not emptying the bins at night. That meant they were often full to overflowing, and the seagulls would pull the rubbish out or it would be blown everywhere by the wind, he said.

Rick told the community board that Xtreme Waste had some flexibility in its contract with council but the hours of work were an issue.

Xtreme Waste has a morning run at 6am and a late afternoon run, but if it wanted to add another run then it would have to push the afternoon run to midday and that would mean long hours for staff.

Rick said he believed most of the problems with rubbish were “non-contractual issues” and he suggested other forms of control.

Parking wardens or the freedom camping officer could issue $400 fines for littering, he said.

“That will change behaviours if you get stung with one of those puppies.”

Rick said it would be also good to have a mandatory waste management plan for large events, similar to the requirement of needing a traffic management plan or a health and safety plan.

“You only need two 21sts on the beach and then the bins are overflowing.”

Rick said rubbish problems highlighted a need to return to bottle refunds, something that was being endorsed by Local Government New Zealand.

“Give them a value and no one puts them in the bins or the ocean.”

Inger Vos